Tsar B’s punchy new track lashes out at gold diggers

Listen to the 90s-inspired single here.  

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For those who’ve been troubled by gold diggers—even if it’s just the idea of them—you’ll find solace in Tsar B’s newly released track. The dark, powerful mix of R&B, 90s bubblegum pop and Middle-Eastern influences are accompanied by an artwork that draws from a similar source. Chatting to Glamcult, the rising Belgian artist took us through the idea behind her new work, which is packed with a punch.

You’ve just released your new track, Golddigger. Can you let us in on the creative process behind it?

Well, last year I went on a ski vacation. Before that, I went through a very stressful, unpleasant month and I thought I could just “ski it off”. But each time I found myself in the hills, I felt I had too much aggression in me and I had to go to the hotel and write. So I produced Golddigger in my hotel room. There are some weird voices in it in the background, which I sang in that hotel room. I think my neighbours would’ve been a bit scared (haha).

Golddigger says: tricks don’t work on me. Some people are gold diggers—some in a good and some in a bad way. A lot of the bad ones want to make use of people’s talents and luck, and everyone should be aware of that. You should find people around you that really believe in you and love what you do, not people who want to use you.

Glamcult_TsarB_Golddigger

Is there anything particularly surprising about this track that we should know about?

Yes, the weird voices in the chorus I told you about! I like to use my voice as a synth.

Your music often incorporates Middle-Eastern influences, what’s the reason behind this?

To be very honest, it was never really my intention to put this into my music, but as I listened a lot to that sort of music, it became a part of me. Sometimes I automatically sing/write/play violin in Arabic scales rather than the Western ones; they are the most natural, beautiful scales (in my opinion).

Can you tell us a little bit about the artwork?

It was made by Willem Stapel, a Dutch photographer, designer and artist. He’s very talented. I found my inspiration in a lot of different genres including 90s bubblegum music—that’s why we used these colours/this style. I asked for something with a mouth and he just rocked it.

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Words by Rebecca Nevins